Card Meanings

The High Priestess in Love

High Priestess - Ancient Egyptian Tarot

Ancient Egyptian Tarot by Clive Barrett

The High Priestess often represents the anima of the seeker in a reading for a man. He could be projecting these qualities on a woman which inevitably leads to disappointment: first she can do no wrong (she’s an angel, his muse, a saint etc). However, after a while the rose-tinted spectacles fall off – she is torn to shreds and called a whore, a demon or worse.

However, she could also represent his soul mate and closest ally. Look for supporting cards around the High Priestess, such as The Lovers, the 2 of Cups or the 6 of Cups for confirmation of this.

As relationship advice, The High Priestess advices us to listen closely to that still small voice within. The answers we seek can be accessed on an intuitive level – perhaps in messages we receive in dreams.

Pay particular attention to dreams that contain water in any form. They will reveal a lot about the situation and the potential of a relationship. Dreams of snow and ice reveal frozen emotions or distance in a relationship. A tsunami could signify feeling emotionally overwhelmed and fearful about the future.

There is a lack of stability with this card. Emotions could rise and fall like the tides of the Ocean.

The High Priestess is also known to be quite secretive. There is an element of needing to uncover all the facts before taking the next step. Waiting a month could be a good idea.

Fertility issues and female reproductive health are addressed by this card as well as by The Empress card. The High Priestess relates to the female monthly cycle which is often synchronised with the Moon – the planet corresponding to The High Priestess. Within this card is found the secret of the unfertilized ovum, waiting for the sperm to find it.

It could indicate a risk of falling pregnant if you are having unprotected sex – especially next to The Empress, The Sun, the Aces and the Pages.

Sexually, the High Priestess teaches us to be more receptive and to flow with the natural cycles of the breath and arousal, without rushing toward a climax.

 

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